Sustainable aquaculture and aquatic resources management

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, Vol. XX No. 2, April-June 2015

Published: 21/12/2016 | 611 views

Sustainable aquaculture

  • Peter Edwards writes on rural aquaculture: Successful demonstration of new model for rural development in Myanmar
  • Optimisation of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) production in ponds based on improved farm management practices in Rwanda
    Ndorimana Jean Claude, Nguyen Van Tien, Pham Quoc Hung

Research and farming techniques

  • EUS infection in fresh water fishes of Andhra Pradesh, India
    B. Laxmappa
  • Development of pond reared broodstock / spawners of green mud crab Scylla serrata
    Shyne Anand, P.S., C. P. Balasubramanian, A. Panigrahi, C. Gopal, Sugeet Kuma and T.K. Ghoshal

NACA Newsletter

  • 12th Technical Advisory Committee held in Cha-am, Thailand
  • Audio recordings: WAS special session on regional cooperation for improved biosecurity
  • Pillay Aquaculture Foundation Awards for Scientists in Least Developed Countries
  • Gender Seminar Conducted and ASEAN Gender Network Launched
  • A two-tube, nested PCR detection method for AHPND bacteria
  • 9th Regional Grouper Hatchery Production Training Course
  • Developing an environmental monitoring system to strengthen fisheries and aquaculture in the Lower Mekong Basin
  • Regional Workshop on the Status of Aquatic Genetic Resources

Guidebook on farmer-to-farmer extension approach for small-scale freshwater aquaculture

Published: 15/9/2016 | 1090 views

This guidebook was prepared as an offshoot of the International Symposium on Small-scale Freshwater Aquaculture Extension, which was held in Bangkok, Thailand in December 2013. This document will serve as a guide on how to implement farmer-to-farmer approaches on small-scale freshwater aquaculture extension, which was solely based on successful on-farm experiences mostly in freshwater aquaculture in Cambodia. Every subject in this guidebook can be modified depending on the existing local situation and condition where the extension programmes will be implemented. It is also hoped that this guidebook can be adapted to other small-scale aquaculture operations in the region (e.g. brackishwater and coastal aquaculture), especially in poor rural areas.

NACA Newsletter, January-June 2016

Published: 9/6/2016 | 1498 views
  • NACA conducts workshops on white spot disease and shrimp health management in I.R. Iran.
  • Don’t forget to register for the 11th Asian Fisheries and Aquaculture Forum!
  • NACA pays tribute to Professor H.P.C. Shetty – Patron of the Pillay Aquaculture Foundation.
  • EHP: Shrimp industry survey.
  • 3rd International Conference on Fisheries and Aquaculture, 24-25 August, Negombo, Sri Lanka.
  • Special Session on the Status of Aquatic Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture.
  • Second International Technical Workshop on Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND).
  • Guidebook on Farmer-to-Farmer Extension Approach for Small-Scale Freshwater Aquaculture.
  • Sustainable intensification of aquaculture in the Asia-Pacific region.

Forteenth Meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health

Published: 28/3/2016 | 1462 views

This report was prepared by the 14th Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health (AG) that met at KU Home, Kasetsart University Campus on 23rd to 25th November, 2015. The report provides:

  • A progress report on NACA’s Regional Aquatic Animal Health Programme.
  • A discussion of OIE standards and global issues in aquatic animal health.
  • A review of regional aquatic animal disease status, including of shrimp, finfish, amphibian and molluscan diseases.
  • Reports on the aquatic animal health programmes of partner agencies.
  • Revisions to the regional aquatic animal disease reporting system, including the listing of HPM-EHP.

Guidelines for hatchery production of Pa Phia fingerlings in Lao PDR

Author(s): Ingram, B.A., Chanthavong, K., Nanthalath, T., De Silva, S.S. | Published: 4/2/2016 | 1532 views

This manual provides basic guidelines for the hatchery production of Pa Phia (Labeo chrysophekadion) fingerlings. It provides information on managing and spawning broodstock, genetic guidelines, egg incubation, hatching larviculture and fry rearing. The manual draws on published information on Pa Phia; results of artificial propagation trials conducted on Pa Phia during two projects funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research and the experiences of technicians at two government hatcheries.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, Vol. XX No. 1, January-March 2015

Published: 24/12/2015 | 2433 views

Sustainable aquaculture

Peter Edwards writes on rural aquaculture: Further training provided to aquaculturists in Fiji.

Spatial planning for sustainable coastal shrimp production.
Olivier M. Joffre, Pham Dang Tri, Tran Thi Phung Ha, Roel H. Bosma

Research and farming techniques

Availability of grouper (Serranidae) fingerlings and seed in the coral reef of Son Tra Peninsula, central Viet Nam.
Nguyen Thi Tuong Vi, Vo Van Quang, Le Thi Thu Thao, Tran Thi Hong Hoa, Tran Cong Thinh

People in aquaculture
Small-scale carp seed production through portable FRP hatchery at Khanguri, Odisha: A case of technology transfer in remote and inaccessible village.
B. C. Mohapatra, N. K. Barik, S. K. Mahanta, H. Sahu, B. Mishra and D. Majhi

NACA Newsletter

  • Regional consultation on culture-based fisheries developments in Asia.
  • Gender Assessment Synthesis Workshop.
  • NACA participation in the 5th Global Symposium on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries, Lucknow, India.
  • Broodstock management in aquaculture: Long term effort required for regional capacity building.
  • Urgent appeal to control spread of the shrimp microsporidian parasite Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP).

NACA Newsletter, July-September 2015

Published: 22/7/2015 | 2322 views
  • 26th NACA Governing Council Meeting, Bali, Indonesia
  • Regional Workshop on the Status of Aquatic Genetic Resources
  • Developing an environmental monitoring system to strengthen fisheries and aquaculture in the Lower Mekong basin
  • Regional workshop documents sustainable intensification practices in aquaculture
  • Perspectives on culture-based fisheries developments in Asia
  • SUPERSEAS PhD opportunities

Perspectives on culture-based fisheries developments in Asia

Author(s): De Silva, S., Ingram, B.A., Wilkinson, S. | Published: 12/5/2015 | 4671 views

This book is the proceedings of the “Regional Consultation on Culture-Based Fisheries Development in Asia”, held in Siem Reap, Cambodia, 21-23rd of October 2014, under the auspices of the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), the Mekong River Commission (MRC) and the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA). The consultation was jointly organised by NACA and the Fisheries Administration of the Royal Government of Cambodia.

Food and nutritional security remains problematic in many developing countries.  There are many initiatives underway which are designed to increase food supply, employment and income opportunities, most of which require considerable capital inputs (for instance cropping, livestock production and aquaculture). Often overlooked, are the opportunities to produce more food from the natural productive ecology of lakes and forests. Culture-based fisheries are one example of a relatively simple and low cost technology which can deliver nutritional and economic benefits to communities which often have few livelihood options.

Culture-based fisheries are based in lakes and reservoirs, where fish populations are supplemented by hatchery-produced fingerlings. The stocked fish may breed naturally in the lakes, or they may be species which are desirable but which do not breed in the still-water environments. Fish growth is driven by the natural productivity of the water bodies. Generally, local communities have ownership of the fish, with the benefits shared or used for communal purposes. However, there are other options for management and ownership depending on local needs, cultural arrangements and other uses of the water.

Research and development of culture-based fisheries has been a major endeavour for NACA and ACIAR since the mid-1990s. This has involved projects in Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Vietnam, Lao PDR and Cambodia, the results of which have been reported in previous publications, as noted below. In this volume, we bring together an update from research conducted in those countries and others. We trust the information will foster further development and spread of culture-based fisheries in Asia and beyond, and in doing so, bring livelihood and nutritional benefits to otherwise resource-poor communities.

Culture-based fisheries in lakes of the Yangtze River basin, China, with special reference to stocking of mandarin fish and Chinese mitten crab

Author(s): Wang, Q., Liu, J., Li, Z., Zhang, T. | Published: 12/5/2015 | 1200 views

Lakes amount to 15% of the total freshwater surface area in China and are important for land-based fisheries. More than 10 species are stocked into lakes to increase production and/or improve water quality. The most common species stocked are the Chinese major carps, i.e. silver carp, bighead carp, grass carp and black carp. In recent years, increasing amount of high valued species such as mandarin fish, mitten crab, yellow catfish and culters were stocked. However, the stocking of mandarin fish and mitten crab perhaps are the most successful because stock enhancement of these two species has been systematically conducted.

In this paper, the culture-based fisheries in lakes are presented, with special reference to mandarin fish and mitten crab stocking in lakes in China. The stocking rate of mandarin fish is determined by food consumption rates, which are mainly related to water temperature and fish size, and prey fish productivity. A bioenergetics model of mandarin fish was established to predict the growth and consumption of prey fish in stocked lakes. Impacts of stocked mandarin fish on wild mandarin fish populations are also dealt with. The stocking model of mitten crab in of culture-based fisheries was also determined based on biomass of macrophyte coverage, benthos biomass and ratio of Secchi depth to mean water depth in lakes.

Since increasing attention is being paid to eutrophication of lakes in China, land-based fisheries development now prioritise maintaining integrity of water quality and biodiversity conservation. Integrated stocking of different species and lakes fisheries management are also addressed.

Culture-based fishery of giant freshwater prawn: Experiences from Thailand

Author(s): Jutagate, T, Kwangkhang, W. | Published: 12/5/2015 | 1492 views

Releasing of giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) for the purposes of stock enhancement and to create a fishery has been conducted in Thailand since the 1980s. In each year, over a hundred million post larvae (30 day old post larvae of ~1 cm) of M. rosenbergii have been released into inland waters nationwide. The stocking density is, generally, about 2,500 prawn larvae/ha. Average age at harvest is around 6 to 8 months, with an average total length of 20 cm. The individual weights can range between 100 and 200 g after a year of release. Common fishing gears are gillnet, long-lines and traps, the latter designed exclusively for M. rosenbergii. Overall, the success of stocking M. rosenbergii is poor since the recapture rate is generally less than 5 %. However, the economic return is high. Average market price of M. rosenbergii is 150 Thai Baht/kg, which is about 3 times more than the average price of marketed freshwater fish. The profit is reported to be as high as 800 %. Moreover, the high market price of M. rosenbergii benefits traders at various levels, job creation and income for all related sectors. Although the economic profit is very high, the low rate of recapture of stocked M. rosenbergii makes this culture-based practice not entirely satisfactory. The major problem is that there are no guidelines in regard to the optimum size of seed for release as well as appropriate time and location to be stocked, that could enhance the rate of return and economic returns.

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