Sustainable aquaculture and aquatic resources management

Perspectives on culture-based fisheries developments in Asia

Author(s): De Silva, S., Ingram, B.A., Wilkinson, S. | Published: 12/5/2015 | 4671 views

This book is the proceedings of the “Regional Consultation on Culture-Based Fisheries Development in Asia”, held in Siem Reap, Cambodia, 21-23rd of October 2014, under the auspices of the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), the Mekong River Commission (MRC) and the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA). The consultation was jointly organised by NACA and the Fisheries Administration of the Royal Government of Cambodia.

Food and nutritional security remains problematic in many developing countries.  There are many initiatives underway which are designed to increase food supply, employment and income opportunities, most of which require considerable capital inputs (for instance cropping, livestock production and aquaculture). Often overlooked, are the opportunities to produce more food from the natural productive ecology of lakes and forests. Culture-based fisheries are one example of a relatively simple and low cost technology which can deliver nutritional and economic benefits to communities which often have few livelihood options.

Culture-based fisheries are based in lakes and reservoirs, where fish populations are supplemented by hatchery-produced fingerlings. The stocked fish may breed naturally in the lakes, or they may be species which are desirable but which do not breed in the still-water environments. Fish growth is driven by the natural productivity of the water bodies. Generally, local communities have ownership of the fish, with the benefits shared or used for communal purposes. However, there are other options for management and ownership depending on local needs, cultural arrangements and other uses of the water.

Research and development of culture-based fisheries has been a major endeavour for NACA and ACIAR since the mid-1990s. This has involved projects in Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Vietnam, Lao PDR and Cambodia, the results of which have been reported in previous publications, as noted below. In this volume, we bring together an update from research conducted in those countries and others. We trust the information will foster further development and spread of culture-based fisheries in Asia and beyond, and in doing so, bring livelihood and nutritional benefits to otherwise resource-poor communities.

NACA Newsletter, July-December 2014

Published: 3/11/2014 | 2301 views
  • Culture-based fisheries exchange visit from Lao to Cambodia.
  • National Fish Day, Cambodia.
  • WAS Adelaide: Special Session on Regional Cooperation for Improved Biosecurity.
  • Inbreeding and disease in tropical shrimp aquaculture: a reappraisal and caution.
  • Shrimp EMS/AHPND Special Session at DAA9.
  • 2nd International Symposium on Aquaculture and Fisheries Education.
  • Report on Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security and Nutrition.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, Vol. XIX No. 1, January-March 2014

Published: 25/7/2014 | 3362 views

Sustainable aquaculture
Peter Edwards writes on rural aquaculture: Towards meeting future demand for fish: Aquaculture in inland or marine land or water-based systems?

Status of carp farming in India
R. Laxmappa

Research and farming techniques
Recent trends in mariculture in S.E. Sulawesi, Indonesia: General considerations
Wa Iba Sahrir, La Ode M. Aslan, La Ode Ridwan Bolu, Geoff J. Gooley, Brett A. Ingram, Sena S. De Silva

Murrel culture in backyard cement tanks: A breakthrough and a success story
M. A. Haniffa and S. Jafar Sathik

Mobile telephony – ICT enabled fisheries extension service for sustainable shrimp farming
D. Deboral Vimala, K. Ramkumar, M. Kumaran, T. Ravisankar, P. Mahalakshmi, P. Ravichandran and A.G. Ponniah

NACA Newsletter

  • International Symposium on Small-scale Freshwater Aquaculture Extension, 2-5 December, Bangkok
  • 12th Meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health
  • National Workshop on EMS/AHPND of Cultured Shrimp held in India
  • Report on early mortality syndrome / acute hepatopancreatic necrosis syndrome of shrimp
  • Sustaining Ethical Aquaculture Trade Newsletter
  • India and the AFSPAN Project
  • Report on AFSPAN Chilean survey
  • Feeding and feed management of Indian major carps in Andhra Pradesh

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, Vol. XVIII No. 4, October-December 2013

Published: 20/3/2014 | 3686 views

Sustainable aquaculture
Peter Edwards writes on rural aquaculture: Pond aquaculture taking off in Nepal

Introduction of culture based fishery practices in small water bodies in Cambodia: issues and strategies
Srun Limsong, Hort Sitha, Ou Sary, Ouch Vutha, C.V. Mohan, Sena S. De Silva

Research and farming techniques
A case study on polycheate fishery by the Irular tribal fishing community on the Tamil Nadu Coast
S. Velvizhi, A.Gopalakrishnan, P. Murugesan and D. Kannan

Use of pangasius pond sediment for rooftop bag gardening: Potential for rural-urban integrated aquaculture-horticulture
M. Mahfujul Haque, M. S. Monira, M. A. Salam, A. P. Shinn and D. C. Little

NACA Newsletter

  • Culture-based fisheries exchanges between Lao PDR and Cambodia
  • National aquatic animal disease surveillance programme launched in India
  • Report on early mortality syndrome / acute hepatopancreatic necrosis syndrome of shrimp
  • International Symposium on Small-scale Freshwater Aquaculture Extension, 2-5 December Bangkok
  • 'Perfect' food for 'perfect' prawns
  • Aquaculture without Frontiers Special Session
  • We asked CSIRO: Gold Coast Tiger Prawns
  • Understanding the sex of salmon
  • Overcoming smallholder challenges with biotechnology
  • Coordinated efforts in aquaculture needed to meet global demand
  • FAO e-book collection for tablets and e-readers

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, Vol. XVIII, No. 1 January-March 2013

Published: 1/1/2013 | 4688 views
  • Peter Edwards writes on rural aquaculture: The EU-funded project ‘Sustainable and Ethical Aquaculture Trade’ (SEAT) in China.
  • Oyster aquaculture for coastal defence with food production in Bangladesh.
    M. Shahadat Hossain, Arjo Rothuis, Sayedur Rahman Chowdhury, Aad Smaal, Tom Ysebaert, S.M. Sharifuzzaman, Christiaan van Sluis, Petra Hellegers, Arie van Duijn, Petra Dankers, Shah Nawaz Chowdhury and Subrata Sarker
  • Importance of mycotoxins in aquaculture feeds
    Vikash Kumar, Suvra Roy, Debtanu Barman, Aditya Kumar, Lokesh Paul and Wakambam Anand Meetei
  • A model modular farm for size grading and monosex culture of freshwater prawn
    G. Venugopal., P. P. Suresh Babu & P. Srinivasa Rao
  • Angelwing clam (Pholas orientalis) future assured after Thai DOF’s breeding success
    Tanate Poomtong
  • Ompok bimaculatus, an emerging species for diversification of aquaculture in Tripura, north-eastern India
    Chandan Debnath, Lopamudra Sahoo, Mrinmoy Datta and SV Ngachan
  • NACA Newsletter

Literature Review on the potential contribution of fish-related activities to food and nutritional security and poverty alleviation

Author(s): AFSPAN Project | Published: 11/2/2013 | 6772 views
The objective of this document is to review the literature that has been published so far on the potential contribution of fish-related activities (aquaculture and fisheries) to food and nutritional security and poverty alleviation. This body of literature –which is found essentially in the aquaculture/fisheries literature, but also for some parts in the nutrition literature- turns out to be relatively heterogeneous and scattered, relying on different types of indicators and data. This information, which has been generated by different methodologies, applied at various scale (household, community, national levels), offers therefore very limited possibility for rigorous comparison or aggregation across projects, location or countries.

In this report the task consisted in collating these analyses and producing the first comprehensive overview of the data and methods used to assess and quantify the role of aquaculture in improving food, nutrition and livelihood in Low Income and Food Deficient countries (LIFDCs). As part of this process, those different analyses were assessed and particular attention was paid to highlight not only the information generated but also the gap in knowledge where more research is needed.

Sixty five documents (peer-reviewed articles, project reports, international agencies’ reports) were identified and reviewed. To maximize the range of the assessment, the review included both aquaculture and fisheries documents. The complete list of these documents is presented at the end of this document.

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