Sustainable aquaculture and aquatic resources management

The Colombo Declaration: A Commitment to Regional Cooperation in Aquaculture Development

Published: 6/9/2011 | 1631 views

The Colombo Declaration is a commitment to regional cooperation in aquaculture development for food security, nutrition and economic development in Asia. It was developed and agreed on by delegations from 18 states at a ministerial-level meeting held in Colombo, Sri Lanka, 28-29 July 2011.

Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture

Published: 28/1/2010 | 12850 views

NACA is pleased to announce the release of a new flagship publication, Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture. The stories in this book reflect the unique nature of Asian aquaculture, providing first-time insight into how and why it has become so successful. Overall, the book demonstrates how the resiliency, adaptability, and innovation of small-scale aquaculture farmers have been crucial to this success. It also places aquaculture development in Asia into a wider global context, and describes its relationship to natural systems, social conditions, and economics. The book is unique in its in-depth presentation of primary research on Asian aquaculture, and in demonstrating how aquaculture can have a lasting positive impact on livelihoods, food security, and sustainable development.


Contents


Aquaculture Successes in Asia: Contributing to Sustained Development and Poverty Alleviation
Sena S. De Silva and F. Brian Davy


Recent Developments in Rice-fish Culture in China: A Holistic Approach for Livelihood Improvement in Rural Areas
Miao Weimin


Shrimp Farmers in India: Empowering Small-Scale Farmers through a Cluster-Based Approach
N.R. Umesh, A.B. Chandra Mohan, G. Ravibabu, P.A. Padiyar, M.J. Phillips, C.V. Mohan, and B. Vishnu Bhat


Backyard Hatcheries and Small Scale Shrimp and Prawn Farming in Thailand
Hassanai Kongkeo and F. Brian Davy


Cage Fish Culture: An Alternative Livelihood Option for Communities Displaced by Reservoir Impoundment in Kulekhani, Nepal
Tek B. Gurung, Raja M. Mulmi, K.C. Kalyan, G. Wagle, Gagan B. Pradhan, K. Upadhayaya, and Ash K. Rai


Enhancing Rural Farmer Income through Fish Production: Secondary Use of Water Resources in Sri Lanka and Elsewhere
Upali S. Amarasinghe and Thuy T.T. Nguyen


Striped Catfish Aquaculture in Vietnam: A Decade of Unprecedented Development
Nguyen Thanh Phuong and Dang Thi Hoang Oanh


The Genetic Improvement of Farmed Tilapias Project: Impact and Lessons Learned
Belen O. Acosta and Modadugu V. Gupta


The Role of Exotics in Chinese Inland Aquaculture
Jiashou Liu and Zhongjie Li


Synthesis and Lessons Learned
Sena S. De Silva, F. Brian Davy, and Michael J. Phillips


This book will appeal to a wide range of readers. The introduction and conclusion give an excellent general overview of Asian aquaculture, and the individual case studies provide a wealth of new information for specialist readers. Researchers, development workers, and decision-makers, in particular, will be interested in how the Asian experience might be used to strengthen aquaculture development more generally and in other parts of the developing tropics of Latin America and Africa.


Success stories in Asian Aquaculture is edited by by Sena S. De Silva, Director General of the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific, and F. Brian Davy, Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Sustainable Development in Canada. You can order hard copies of the book online from the Springer website.

Research Needs in Sustaining the Aquaculture Sector in Asia-Pacific to Year 2025 and Beyond

Published: 2/1/2008 | 2183 views

Asian aquaculture has many a success and some failures. There had been many a review on Global Aquaculture and Asian Aquaculture, and in essence all these reviews have dealt with the trends per se, but have not attempted, explicitly, to address the main research issues and needs to sustain Asian aquaculture and specifically to explore how aquaculture research can contribute to poverty reduction into the first quarter of the 21st century. Equally, there had been reviews on the impacts of improvements in aquaculture, but these are also based on single commodity studies/ evaluations. Asian aquaculture will have to be innovative and also ensure social responsibility if it were to develop further, contribute to poverty alleviation and well being of the poor rural communities. It is in this context that identification of research priorities becomes imperative. IDRC and NACA therefore convened a workshop to identify the main research issues and needs to sustain Asian aquaculture into the first quarter of the 21st century, and also to bring them to the notice of relevant planners, managers and policy makers, and potential donors. The workshop was held in Rayong, Thailand from 4-7 June 2007. This report contains the issues papers drafted in preparation for the meeting and a summary of the discussions. The contents include: Population growth and food fish needs. Climate changes and aquaculture research. Alien species and biodiversity in aquaculture. Broodstock and genetic resources management in aquaculture. Aquaculture and human health hazards ? emerging issues. Integrated fish farming. Feed development needs. Effective utilization of inland water resources for food fish production. Some socio-economic and policy research themes. Innovations in mariculture. The successful development of backyard hatcheries for crustaceans: A case study from Thailand. Concept note on gene technology in aquaculture. Tilapia farming in the Philippines and challenges in relation to rural development. Country reviews for Nepal, Sri Lanka and Pakistan.

Comparative assessment of the environmental costs of aquaculture and other food production sectors

Published: 16/4/2008 | 2928 views

Bartley, D.M.; Brugere, C.; Soto, D.; Gerber, P.; Harvey, B. (eds). Comparative assessment of the environmental costs of aquaculture and other food production sectors: methods for meaningful comparisons. FAO/WFT Expert Workshop. 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada. FAO Fisheries Proceedings. No. 10. Rome, FAO. 2007. This document represents the report of the FAO/WFT workshop, Comparative Environmental Costs of Aquaculture and Other Food Production Sectors, convened in Vancouver, British Columbia, 24-28 April, 2006.


The global food production sector is growing. In many areas farming systems are intensifying. This rapid growth has in some cases caused environmental damage. This document include an introduction and 12 review papers describing methods for such comparisons as well as the deliberations of their authors, a group of nineteen international experts on environmental economics, energy accounting, material and environmental flows analysis, aquaculture, agriculture and international development. Experts concluded that comparisons can be useful for addressing local development and zoning concerns, global issues of sustainability and trade and consumer preferences for inexpensive food produced in an environmentally sustainable manner. In order to be useful, however, methods to assess environmental costs should be scientifically based, comparable across different sectors, expandable to different scales, inclusive of externalities, practical to implement and easily understood by managers and policy-makers. Aquaculture in many locations and conditions is or could be much more environment friendly than other food sectors.

Research Needs to Sustain Asia-Pacific Aquaculture to 2025 and Beyond

Published: 13/5/2007 | 2255 views

These papers were presented for discussion at the workshop Research Nees to Sustain Asia-Pacific Aquaculture to Year 2025 and Beyond, held in Rayong, Thailand 4-7 June 2007, with funding support from the International Development Research Centre.


The "Concept Notes" and a note on a success story from research, presented here represent a few of the major topics that we believe should receive attention but is not considered to be exhaustive, however. Hopefully these provide the base line for discussions and the format of the presentations that are expected from the participants. There will also likely to be some overlap in the contents, which perhaps is unavoidable to a certain extent. The literature cited in the notes is available for reference, if needed, and all other presentations are also expected to be backed up with relevant citations. Obviously, there will be some overlap between some of the concept papers; this is perhaps unavoidable. The "Concept Notes" included in this document are:



  • Background information on aquaculture production needs.

  • Climate changes & aquaculture research.

  • Alien species and biodiversity in aquaculture.

  • Broodstock and genetic resources management in aquaculture.

  • Aquaculture and human health hazards-emerging issues.

  • Integrated fish farming.

  • Feed development needs.

  • Effective utilization of inland water resources for food fish production.

  • Some socio-economic and policy research themes.

  • Innovations in mariculture (three specific concepts).

  • The successful development of backyard hatcheries for crustaceans: a case study from Thailand.

  • Concept note on gene technology in aquaculture.

Intensification of Food Production in Low Income Food Deficit Countries Through Aquaculture

Published: 24/2/2004 | 3093 views
Full title:Report of the FAO/CIFA/NACA Expert Consultation on the Intensification of Food Production in Low Income Food Deficit Countries through Aquaculture. Bhubaneswar, India, 16?19 October 2001.

This document was the result of the discussions, conclusions and recommendations reached during the Expert Consultation in consultation held in Bhubaneswar, India, 16-19 October 2001. It was based on country reviews (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Pakistan, Nepal, and Sri Lanka), a synthesis paper (India), a technical guideline paper (Chinese experience) and resource expert papers (diseases and health management, water use and environment, nutrition and feeding) made available or presented during the Expert Consultation. The consultation was organized by FAO/CIFA/NACA. 62 pages.

Transboundary aquatic animal pathogen transfer and the development of harmonized standards

Published: 16/2/2004 | 2023 views


Full title: Transboundary aquatic animal pathogen transfer and the development of harmonized standards on aquaculture health management APEC/FAO/NACA/SEMARNAP.

A summary of the joint expert workshop held in Mexico July 2000. Includes technical presentations and country reviews. The outcome, the Puerto Vallarta Plan of Action incorporates a wide range of recommendations for short, medium and long term action to control the spread of serious aquatic animal pathogens through trade.197 pages. (1.07 MB)

Report of the Expert Consultation on Aquaculture Education in the Asia-Pacific

Published: 19/11/2003 | 2751 views
APEC/NACA/Deakin University. De Silva et al. (eds.).

The papers and findings and follow-up recommendations of the APEC Collaborative Aquaculture Education Program implemented by Deakin University and NACA, including on the formation of a regional aquaculture education consortium. 239 pages. (960 KB)

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