Sustainable aquaculture and aquatic resources management

Kallaya Sritunyalucksana1,2,3, Piyachat Sanguanrut1, Paul Vinu Salachan1,5, Siripong Thitamadee1,2 and Timothy W. Flegel1,4
1Center of Excellence for Shrimp Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama VI Rd., Bangkok, 10400.
2Shrimp-virus interaction laboratory (ASVI), Thailand National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), Yothi office, Rama VI Rd. Bangkok, 10400, Thailand
3Thailand National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Thailand Science Park Pathumthani, 12120, Thailand
4Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama VI Rd. Bangkok, 10400, Thailand.
5VIT UniversityVellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014, India

What is EHP?

Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) is a microsporidian parasite that was first characterized and named from the giant or black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon from Thailand in 2009 (Tourtip et al. 2009. J. Invertebr. Pathol. 102: 21-29). It was discovered in slow growing shrimp but was not statistically associated with slow growth at that time. EHP is confined to the shrimp hepatopancreas (HP) and morphologically resembles an unnamed microsporidian previously reported in the HP of Penaeus japonicas from Australia in 2001. Together, these studies suggest that EHP is not an exotic pathogen but that it is endemic to Australasia. Later, it was found that EHP could also infect exotic Penaeus vannamei imported for cultivation in Asia and that it could be transmitted directly from shrimp to shrimp by the oral route (Tangprasittipap et al. 2013. BMC Vet Res. 9:139). This differed from the most common microsporidian previously reported from cotton shrimp, where transmission required an intermediate fish host, allowing disruption of transmission by exclusion of fish from the production system.

Headlines

Projects

Aquaculture for Food Security, Poverty Alleviation and Nutrition

Tags: Livelihoods
Aquaculture for Food Security, Poverty Alleviation and Nutrition

The AFSPAN Project is a three-year initiative to improve our understanding of the role of aquaculture in food security, poverty alleviation and human nutrition. The project is developing new methodologies to quantify the impact of aquaculture in developing nations and low income food deficit countries. It will enable the efficient planning, coordination and implementation of research and development programmes supporting the sustainable expansion of aquaculture, and increasing its impact on food security, livelihoods and poverty alleviation for poor people.

Thematic Studies on Gender in aquaculture in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Vietnam

Aquaculture is an important component of food security. Mainstreaming gender is in aquaculture value chains is crucial to inform decision making and policy formulation. The project aims to strengthen ASEAN as an institutional platform for improving regional food security via the USAID-MARKET Project.

Culture-based Fisheries Development in Lao PDR and Cambodia

Culture-based fisheries development in Lao PDR and Cambodia

Culture-based fisheries have been accepted as a useful development strategy, as a low-cost measure to mobilise dryland farming communities (e.g. rice farmers) to use existing water bodies for the secondary purpose of food fish production. The strategies to optimise benefits from CBF, however, vary in detail from country to country and across climatic regimes. The project will introduce community-based CBF in Cambodia, and seek to consolidate gains of communities that have adopted CBF in Lao PDR.

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